Magnus

5 - 3

Ian

IAN
NEPOMNIACHTCHI

PLAY

ERS

MAGNUS
CARLSEN

Fide World
Championship
Dubai 2021

NOV 24TH
DEC 16TH
Algorand
Chessable
Kaspersky
Phosagro
Algorand
Chessable
Kaspersky
Phosagro

Magnus
Carlsen

World
Champion

  • World Rank (Active): 1
  • Federation Norway
  • FIDE ID: 1503014
  • B-Year: 1990
  • Sex: Male
  • FIDE title: Grandmaster

RATINGS

  • std2856
  • rapid2842
  • blitz2892

Ian
Nepomniachtchi

The
Challenger

  • World Rank (Active): 5
  • Federation Russia
  • FIDE ID: 4168119
  • B-Year: 1990
  • Sex: Male
  • FIDE title: Grandmaster

RATINGS

  • std2782
  • rapid2798
  • blitz2792

Head to head

Standard

  • M C

    Year

    Tournament

    I N

  • 0

    2002

    EU Championship U12

    1

  • ½

    2002

    World Championship U12

    ½

  • 0

    2003

    World Championship U14

    1

  • 0

    2011

    Tata Steel

    1

  • ½

    2011

    Tal Memorial

    ½

  • ½

    2017

    Tata Steel

    ½

  • ½

    2017

    Sinquefield Cup

    ½

  • 0

    2017

    London Classics

    1

  • ½

    2019

    Tata Steel

    ½

  • 1

    2019

    GCT Croatia

    0

  • ½

    2019

    Sinquefield Cup

    ½

  • ½

    2021

    Norway Chess

    ½

  • ½

    2021

    Norway Chess

    ½

  • 5

    8

Rapid

  • CARLSEN – NEPOMNIACHTCHI (Over-the-board rapid games between Magnus Carlsen and Ian Nepomniachtchi from 2015 to 2020)

  • 5-2 (+4-1=2)

BLITZ (Including Armageddon)

  • CARLSEN – NEPOMNIACHTCHI (Over-the-board blitz games between the opponents from 2010 to 2021)

  • 9½-5½ (+5-1=9)

PEAK RATING

  • CARLSEN

    (May 2014 and August 2019)

    rt2882

  • Nepomniachtchi

    (May 2021)

    rt2792

PEAK RANKING

  • CARLSEN

    (May 2014 and August 2019)

    #1

  • Nepomniachtchi

    (May 2021)

    #4

Super Tournament Victories

  • CARLSEN – 31

  • BI 2007 AND 2011

  • AEROSVIT 2008

  • LONDON CLASSIC IN 2009, 2010, 2012 AND 2015

  • PEARL SPRING TOURNAMENT 2009 AND 2010

  • KING’S TOURNAMENT 2010 AND 2011

  • BILBAO MASTERS 2011, 2012 AND 2016

  • TAL MEMORIAL 2011 AND 2012

  • SINQUEFIELD CUP 2013 AND 2018 (CO-WINNER)

  • ZURICH CHESS CHALLENGE 2014

  • GASHIMOV MEMORIAL 2014, 2015, 2018 AND 2019

  • QATAR MASTERS 2015

  • NORWAY CHESS 2016, 2019, 2020, 2021

  • ISLE OF MAN MASTERS 2017

  • GRENKE 2019

  • GCT ZAGREB 2019

  • NEPOMNIACHTCHI – 10

  • AEROFLOT OPEN 2008 AND 2015

  • EUROPEAN INDIVIDUAL CHAMPIONSHIP 2010

  • RUSSIAN CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2010

  • HAINAN DANZHOU GM TOURNAMENT 2016

  • TAL MEMORIAL 2016

  • DORTMUND IN 2018

  • FIDE GRAND PRIX MOSCOW 2019

  • FIDE GRAND PRIX JERUSALEM 2019

  • RUSSIAN CHAMPIONSHIP SUPERFINAL 2021

Wilhelm
Steinitz

Wilhelm Steinitz, 1886 – 1894

Highly influential analyst and theoretician, the author of positional school in chess, Wilhelm Steinitz became informal #1 in the world after defeating Adolf Andersen in a very close match (London, 1866). Only twenty years later, he won the World Championship match against Zukertort (the USA, 1886) and became the first World Champion. He defended his title in the matches with Chigorin (Habana, 1888 and 1892) and Gunsberg (New York, 1890) but was dethroned by Lasker in 1894.

Emanuel
Lasker

Emanuel Lasker, 1894 – 1921

The longest reigning World Champion (27 years!), Emmanuel Lasker (1868-1941), beat Steinitz in the title match (1894) but became the undisputed leader of the chess world two years later after winning an elite 4-player tournament in St-Petersburg (1895-1896). After reeling off several impressive tournament victories, Lasker successfully defended his crown in the matches against Marshall (the USA, 1907), Tarrasch (Germany, 1908), Janovsky (Berlin, 1910) and Schlechter (Vienna-Berlin, 1910) but eventually he was defeated by Capablanca (Habana, 1921). After losing his title, Lasker remained an extremely strong player, famously winning a stellar tournament in New York (1924).

José Raúl
Capablanca

José Raúl Capablanca, 1921 – 1927

One of the most talented players ever, Jose Raul Capablanca (1888-1942), quickly made his way up on the chess arena before World War I and earned a moral right to challenge Lasker. The title match was played only in 1921 in Habana due to World War I and protracted negotiations. Jose Raul defeated Lasker convincingly +4 -0 = 10 and became the third World Champion. Despite popular belief (the champion seemed invincible and even was dubbed the “Human Chess Machine”), his reign over the chess world lasted only six years as he lost the title match to Alekhine in 1927.

Alexander
Alekhine

Alexander Alekhine, 1927 – 1935, 1937 – 1946

A top player by the age of 22, a native of Moscow Alexander Alekhine (1892-1946), stringed together several impressive tournament victories in the mid-1920s and managed to secure a $10,000 prize fund for a title match with Capablanca. Played in 1927 in Buenos Aires, this match is still considered one of the most exciting and dramatic duels in chess history. Alekhine won the match (+6-3=25) and became the fourth World Champion. Alekhine dominated the tournaments in the early 1930s and handily defended his title in the matches with Bogoljubov in 1929 and 1934.

Max
Euwe

Max Euwe, 1935 – 1937

A math professor by occupation, Max Euwe (1901-1981) established himself as a credible challenger to Alekhine in the early 1930s after a series of good results in tournaments and matches. Euwe challenged Alekhine in 1933, and two years later, the champion picked up the gauntlet. Alekhine was considered a clear favourite, but somewhat unexpectedly, Euwe prevailed in a close match (the Netherlands, 1935) by a score of 15½-14½ to become the fifth World Champion.

Alexander
Alekhine

Alexander Alekhine, 1927 – 1935, 1937 – 1946

After diligent preparation, Alekhine won the rematch against Euwe in 1937 (+10-4=11) and returned the title. Due to World War II, he played no more matches and remained unbeaten until his untimely death in 1946.

Mikhail
Botvinnik

Mikhail Botvinnik, 1948 – 1957, 1958 – 1960, 1961 – 1963

After Alexander Alekhine died in 1946, the 1948 Wold Chess championship, a five-player tournament, was organized to determine the World Champion. The event held in Hague and Moscow saw the victory of the leader of Soviet chess Mikhail Botvinnik (1911-1995). The pioneer of analytical approach and profound opening preparation, he later drew close matches with Bronstein (Moscow, 1951) and Smyslov (Moscow, 1954) to retain his title (under existing rules at that time).

Vasily
Smyslov

Vasily Smyslov, 1957 – 1958

Arguably the strongest player of the 1950s, Vasily Smyslov (1921-2010) challenged Botvinnik in 1954 after winning the Candidates in Zurich (1953), but the match was drawn. He got a second chance in 1957 after coming out on top in the Candidates in Amsterdam (1956) and took the title by defeating Botvinnik 12½-9½ (Moscow, 1957).

Mikhail
Botvinnik

Mikhail Botvinnik, 1948 – 1957, 1958 – 1960, 1961 – 1963

Mikhail Botvinnik thoroughly prepared for the rematch (Moscow, 1958) and regained the chess crown after beating Smyslov 12½-10½.

Mikhail
Tal

Mikhail Tal, 1960 – 1961

The meteoric rise of Mikhail Tal (1936-1992) staggers imagination – he made it all the way from a mere master to the World Champion over three years. After winning the Candidates Tournament (Yugoslavia, 1959), he challenged Botvinnink in 1960 and seized the chess crown after winning the title match 12½-8½ (Moscow, 1960). His reign was short-lived as he lost the rematch to Botvinnik a year later. Tal came very close to challenging the World Champion one more time but lost the final Candidates match to Spassky (Tbilisi, 1965).

Mikhail
Botvinnik

Mikhail Botvinnik, 1948 – 1957, 1958 – 1960, 1961 – 1963

Botvinnik once again proved himself an unrivalled master of home preparation – he completely changed his strategy and convincingly won the rematch 13-8. However, Tal was not in the best of health.

Tigran
Petrosian

Tigran Petrosian, 1963 – 1969

A fine positional player and brilliant tactician, Tigran Petrosian (1929-1984) was known for his solid style and even nicknamed “Iron Tigran”. He had participated in three Candidates tournaments before finishing first in Curacao (1962), earning the right to challenge the World Champion. In 1963 he dethroned Botvinnik (+5-2=15) and three years later defended his title in the title match against Spassky (12½-11½).

Boris
Spassky

Boris Spassky, 1969 – 1972

One of the most talented players of his generation, Boris Spassky (born in 1937), made his debut in the Candidate Tournament (Amsterdam, 1956) at 19 and showed great potential but then missed two championship cycles only to resume his quest for chess crown eight years later. After defeating Keres (1965), Geller (1965) and Tal (1965), he earned the right to challenge Petrosian but lost the title match (Moscow, 1966). Spassky made it all the way up again in the next cycle and won the crown in his second match (Moscow, 1969) with the ninth world champion by a score of 12½-10½.

Bobby
Fischer

Bobby Fischer, 1972 – 1975

The youngest-ever participant of the Candidates Tournament, Robert James Fischer (1943-2008), came down into history as a person who single-handedly disrupted Soviet dominance in chess. Fisher made his debut in Candidates in 1959, at the tender age of 16, but he was not mature enough to compete with the top Soviet Grandmasters. After winning the Interzonal in Stockholm three years later, Fischer entered the Candidates in Curacao (1962) as one of the favourites, but it turned sour for him as he finished only fourth. Robert James voluntarily missed two championship cycles only to return strong, winning the Interzonal in Palma de Majorca (1970). After pummeling Taimanov (6-0), Larsen (6-0) and Petrosian (6½-2½), he earned the right to play a title match with the reigning champion Boris Spassky (Rejkyavic, 1973). Fischer won by a score of 12½–8½ and became the 11th World Champion. He was expected to defend his title in 1975 against Karpov but refused and lost by default.

Anatoly
Karpov

Anatoly Karpov, 1975 – 1985, 1993 – 1999

Born in Zlatoust (Ural Region, USSR) in 1951, Anatoly Karpov showed great promise from the very start of his career. After a series of excellent results in various competitions, including the Interzonal in Leningrad (1973), he qualified for the Candidates matches. Although Karpov stated “it is not my cycle” on a few occasions, he confidently beat Polugaevsky (+3-0=5) and Spassky (+4-1=6), then prevailed over Korchnoi (+3-2=19) and earned the right to challenge Fischer. After Fischer refused to defend his title, Karpov was crowned as the 12th World Champion. He retained his crown over ten years, defeating Korchnoi in the title matches in Bagio (1978) and Merano (1981).

Garry
Kasparov

Garry Kasparov, 1985 – 1993, 1993 – 2000

Garry Kasparov (born in 1963) was widely thought to be a future champion in his teens, and he lived up to these expectations after winning the Interzonal and Moscow (1982) and crushing Beliavsky (+4-1=4), Korchnoi (+4-1=6) and Smyslov (+4-0=9) in Candidates matches. His unlimited first-to-win-six match with Karpov (Moscow, 1984) became the logest in history. It was terminated without result and stirred up much controversy. Next year another match was organized, which Kasparov won 13-11 to become the youngest World Champion. In the following five years, Kasparov defended his title in three matches with Karpov: London-Leningrad, 1986 (12½–11½), Linares, 1987 (12-12) and New York-Lyon, 1990 (12½–11½).

Anatoly
Karpov

Anatoly Karpov, 1975 – 1985, 1993 – 1999

After Kasparov and Short created PCA and played the title match under this new organization, FIDE organized its own title match between Anatoly Karpov (who lost to Short in semis) and the finalist of the Candidates matches Jan Timman (1993). Karpov defeated his old rival 12½-8½ and then defended the title in the match against Kamsky +6-3=9 (Elista 1996) and the FIDE World Championship final against Anand in 1998 (+2−2=2, rapid tiebreak 2–0).

Alexander
Khalifman

Alexander Khalifman, 1999 – 2000

The first-ever knockout FIDE World Championship in the U.S. took place in Las Vegas (1999). Rated only 44th in the world at that time, GM Alexander Khalifman (born in 1966) from St-Petersburg won seven consecutive matches, including the final with Vladimir Akopian (3½-2½) and took the title.

Viswanathan
Anand

Viswanathan Anand, 2000 – 2002, 2007 – 2013

The first grandmaster from India (born in 1969), one of the most talented players of his generation, Viswanathan Anand, started his quest for the chess crown in the championship cycle 1990-1993 but lost the semifinal against Karpov. Ten years later, he entered FIDE World Championship 2000 as the main favourite and delivered on his promise by winning seven straight matches, including the final with Alexei Shirov (3½-½) and taking the title.

Ruslan
Ponomariov

Ruslan Ponomariov, 2002 – 2004

A native of Ukraine, Ruslan Ponomariov (born in 1983) became the youngest FIDE World Championship winner in chess history. Although not listed among favourites of the FIDE World Championship 2002, the 18-year old Ukrainian made it to the final in which he beat his compatriot Vasyl Ivanchuk by a score of 4½-2½.

Rustam
Kasimdzhanov

Rustam Kasimdzhanov, 2004 – 2005

The FIDE World Chess Championship 2004 was held in Tripoli, Libya. Somewhat unexpectedly, Rustam Kasimdzhanov from Uzbekistan (born in 1979) won six matches, including the victory over the favourites Vasyl Ivanchuk and Veselin Topalov and advanced to the final in which he faced Michael Adams. After six games were drawn, Rustam prevailed on a tiebreak to clinch the title.

Veselin
Topalov

Veselin Topalov, 2005 – 2006

A native of Ruse, Bulgaria, Veselin Topalov (born in 1975) earned the right to play in the FIDE World Chess Championship 2005 in San Luis, Argentina, as one of the top-rated grandmasters. After scoring 6½ out of 7 in the first part of the event (one of the greatest streaks in such competitions), Topalov smoothly sailed to the victory securing the title with a round to spare.

Garry
Kasparov

Garry Kasparov, 1985 – 1993, 1993 – 2000

In 1993 Kasparov and Short (the winner of the Candidates cycle) played the title match outside of FIDE jurisdiction, which Kasparov won 12½–7½. Two years later, he defended his title in the match against the winner of the PCA candidate cycle Viswanathan Anand by a score of 10½–7½ (New York, 1995). Despite losing the chess crown in 2000, he continued to dominate tournaments and was #1 in the FIDE rating list when he retired from professional chess.

Vladimir
Kramnik

Vladimir Kramnik, 2000-2006, 2006-2007

A pupil of Botvinnik chess school, Vladimir Kramnik showed great potential early and debuted in the Russian team at Olympiad in Manila (1992) at 17. He built a very impressive tournament record in the following years and became #1 in the FIDE rating list in January 1996. In 2000 Kasparov organized a title match against Kramnik that took place in London. Kramnik dethroned Kasparov in a memorable battle 8½–6½ without losing a single game. Four years later, he defended his title, drawing the match against Peter Leko (Brissago, 2004).

Vladimir
Kramnik

Vladimir Kramnik, 2000-2006, 2006-2007

In April 2006, FIDE announced a reunification match between Kramnik and Topalov (the FIDE World Chess Championship 2006). The competition took place in Elista, Kalmykia. Vladimir Kramnik beat Veselin Topalov on a tiebreaker and became an undisputed World Champion.

Viswanathan
Anand

Viswanathan Anand, 2000 – 2002, 2007 – 2013

The World Chess Championship 2007 was held in a double round-robin format with the undisputed World Champion Vladimir Kramnik participating. Viswanathan Anand won the event, becoming the only undefeated player in the competition. In the following years, he successfully defended his title by defeating Kramnik 6½-4½ (Bonn, 2008), Topalov 6½-5½ (Sofia, 2010), and prevailing over Gelfand in a tiebreaker (Moscow, 2012).

Magnus
Carlsen

Magnus Carlsen, since 2013

The youngest player ever to surpass a 2800 rating mark, Magnus Carlsen from Norway (born in 1990) stormed into chess elite in his teens. Carlsen withdrew from the Candidates 2010 dissatisfied with the format, but three years later, he won the Candidates Tournament (London, 2013) thanks to better tiebreaks over Vladimir Kramnik and became the challenger. The same year he convincingly defeated Viswanathan Anand in the title match by a score of 6½–3½ and became the World Champion. During his reign, Magnus defended the title beating Anand again 6½–4½ (Sochi 2014) and prevailing in tiebreaks over Sergey Karjakin (New York, 2016) and Fabiano Caruana (London, 2018).

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